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4 Ways to Know if you Aced the Interview

Updated: Jul 16

You have been preparing for this interview for weeks now. Tensions are high and you have “butterflies in your stomach”. You try to refrain from saying “like” or “um”, knowing that you tend to say it frequently. As you look up at the glass skyscraper, you think to yourself how grateful you are for this opportunity to interview at a top firm, yet you are scared to death.


You make the leap and slowly walk into the massive office building. Your hand trembles as you give your driver’s license to the security guard. They give you a guest pass and escort you to the correct elevator. Instantly, the doors squeak open and you enter an empty elevator lined with black felt and a TV screen showing the stock market news on the side wall. As the elevator slowly ascends, all you can think about is the fear of bombing the interview. Suddenly, you feel the elevator stop, and the doors open to the second floor. Within seconds, you are surrounded by a sea of suits, and you can feel your tie slowly choking you. As you make your way up to the penthouse floor of the office building, the doors finally open and you make your way to the reception desk. This is it, you tell yourself. Game time.

Within a blink of an eye, you are already walking out of the company headquarters. As you call the Uber to head home, you try to recall the details of the interview but you are still sweating profusely and can’t remember very much. You are so shaken that you forgot your expensive pen in the office. You decide to leave it there, knowing that you cannot bear to walk back into the office. After five minutes, you hear a loud car horn and the Uber picks you up. As you ride in the Uber with your resume book on your lap, you vaguely remember 4 things that give you hope that you passed the interview:

  1. The interview felt like a conversation

  2. You heard “when” not “if

  3. The employer showed positive body language

  4. The interview ran over time

The interview felt like a conversation.

A colleague of yours told you that the interviews at this company tend to be extremely cutthroat and professional. However, for some reason, your interview felt natural and casual. The employer started the interview speaking in a very structured and serious tone, and then once you found things in common with the employer, the tone of the interview completely changed. You barely talked about the interview questions that you prepared for, but rather your passion for camping and the interviewer’s recent outdoor getaway to Joshua Tree. You felt like you walked out of the room with a new friend.

You heard “when” not “if”.

As the interview came to a close, you thought you misheard the employer when she said “when you start the job, we can discuss you working Friday’s remote”. It must be a strong indicator that the employer already sees you as a good fit for the job, and it might have unintentionally come across their choice of words. They already envision you working there, and you know in your heart that you can too.

The employer showed positive body language.

Even though the employer tried to put on a front that she was a very serious individual, you could tell that she hinted a smile at every one of your answers to her questions. The employer’s enthusiasm for you as a candidate was revealed through head nodding and agreeable “mhmm’s”.

The interview ran over time.

If you did your math correctly, the interview was supposed to last one hour but it ran at least 15 minutes long. And the time was right up against lunch hour, so the interviewer actually cut into their own time to get to know you better. Even though you had some doubt that the interview running overtime was a bad thing, you could tell that the employer was enthusiastic and excited to dive into the next question. This could be a great sign because they think you are a good fit and want to continue chatting with their possible new hire.

That night, you received a call from the employer with the jaw-dropping news: you received the job offer. However, while you were ecstatic, you weren’t really that surprised.


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